Mobile Video Challenges Worldwide
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Mobile Video Challenges Worldwide
Mobile Video: How to deal best with Mobile Video growth, Monetization and all related topics
Curated by Claude Seyrat
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T-Mobile Binge On May Have Found a Mobile Video Sweet Spot - Telecompetitor

T-Mobile Binge On May Have Found a Mobile Video Sweet Spot - Telecompetitor | Mobile Video Challenges Worldwide | Scoop.it
A Strategy Analytics report on T-Mobile Binge On found that 68% of competitors' customers were interested in unmetered video streaming.
Claude Seyrat's insight:

Mobile users ready to accept limited video streaming quality in exchange for unmetered use?

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USA Basketball Exhibition Games Will Stream Live on Facebook

USA Basketball Exhibition Games Will Stream Live on Facebook | Mobile Video Challenges Worldwide | Scoop.it
Nine USA basketball exhibition games will be broadcast live on the social network over the next two weeks.
Claude Seyrat's insight:

In the OTT battle, content is key, but is sports the king of content?

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Having Conquered Mobile, Facebook Sets Its Sights on Video, But Challenges Loom

Having Conquered Mobile, Facebook Sets Its Sights on Video, But Challenges Loom | Mobile Video Challenges Worldwide | Scoop.it
Claude Seyrat's insight:

These are exciting times for live video streaming! The next few months are going to be full of more news like this.

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Executives concede TV isn’t everywhere

Executives concede TV isn’t everywhere | Mobile Video Challenges Worldwide | Scoop.it

"TV was supposed to be everywhere by now – watchable anytime, anywhere, on your smartphone or tablet. But four years into the industry’s effort, network executives readily admit: TV isn’t everywhere.

The promise of “TV Everywhere” has been a key strategy in the cable and satellite TV industry’s fight to retain customers in the face of challenges from online video providers such as Netflix.

With TV Everywhere, customers who pay for packages with hundreds of television channels are supposed to be able to watch them on mobile devices and computers as well for no extra charge. That perk is meant to make pay TV packages seem more worthwhile and keep customers from defecting.

Yet many rights deals still haven’t been worked out. More important, audience measurement firms have been slow to count viewing on mobile devices, so advertisers have been reluctant to pay as much for commercials on phones and tablets compared with television sets.

“We either don’t get any credit at all, or if we do get credit it’s at a fraction of what we would have gotten if they first watched it live on the TV,” Ron Lamprecht, NBCUniversal’s executive vice president for digital distribution, said during a panel at The Cable Show, an industry conference this week.

This gap in ad revenue has created a kind of chicken-and-egg scenario. Networks and pay TV providers aren’t able to offer as many shows online because they don’t want to spend too much for rights without knowing they can make their money back. So, viewers can’t reliably find their favorite shows online and don’t use the services much."


Via Peter Rosenberg
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Peter Rosenberg's curator insight, June 12, 2013 2:46 PM

Having attended the panel discussion referenced in the article, here are my key takeaways (combined with some editorial insight ;-)

 

Universally accepted viewer measuremt across all platforms is essential to driving a level monetization comparable to the traditional/current "big screen" model.  The content availability (and consumers) will follow.  As Ron Lamprecht (NBC Universal) noted “We either don’t get any credit at all, or if we do get credit it’s at a fraction of what we would have gotten if they first watched it live on the TV”.

 

Usability for consumers is still problamatic, especially regarding the authentication process.  While in-home "auto-authentication" by MVPDs able to leverage the identity of the cable modem helps, there are still significant obstacles for users who do not know or remember their credentials. Marcien Jenckes (Comcast) mentioned that Comcast was evaluating the possiblity of leveraging Facebook for TVE logins - an approach I have advocated for some time.  (Synacor now offers Social Login for TVE to its customers.) A device registration process will be critical to enabling secure authentication - especially outside the home.  Some of these issues are currently being discussed and/or addressed in the OATC (http://oatc.us/) Usability Working Group.

 

Public understanding & perception of TVE is also an issue.  As Jeremy Legg (Turner) noted, it is a "project not a product".

 

Discoverabilityand availability of content was also raised as problamatic.  The average consumer does not understand why they can watch content on some devices & places but not others, nor is there an intuitive way for them to discover where and on which platform the content they want to watch is available.  That there are complex rights & contractual issues at play is not something that is easily understood or communicated to the viewer.